Tuesday, 28 July 2015

This Blog as a Course - Lesson Eight

One of the things I present in my blogiography is a set of suggestions on how to approach this blog as a course - that is, how to work through this chaotic hodge podge of material in such a way that some organised benefit may come from it.

Now, this lesson blends knowing and working on oneself with working - pragmatically - on developing or improving one's psychism ... and any other problem that needs 'solving' :)

Incidentally, each of these "lessons" may take many months to work through properly. They've not been done on the basis of doing these weekly or monthly.

Lesson Eight – Problem Solving
In a sense, becoming psychic can be considered to be a problem to be solved: how do I become psychic - or more psychic or a better psychic? Ditto for spiritual, etc. The benefit of this sort of approach is that one tends to be more dispassionate, and thus less prone to disappointment or despair (remember the post about practising for 10,000 hours?)
Have a look at, and a think about, the flow charts located here and here
Now, re-read this post.


[1] BPLF = Balanced Positive (spiritual) Light Forces. See here and here for more on this.
[2]
Please see here and my post "The Death of Wikipedia" for the reasons I now recommend caution when using Wikipedia. I'm also exploring use of h2g2, although that doesn't appear to be as extensive (h2g2 is intended - rather engagingly - to be the Earth edition of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
").
[3] I apologise for the formatting: it seems Blogger is no longer as WYSIWYG as it used to be.

Love, light, hugs and blessings
Gnwmythr, Wéofodthegn
(pronounced "new-MYTH-ear"; ... aka Bellatrix Lux … aka Morinehtar … would-be drýicgan or maga ... )

My "blogiography" (list of all posts and guide as to how to best use this site) is here, and my glossary/index is here.

I started this blog to cover karmic regression-rescue (see here and here), and it grew ... See here for my group mind project, here and here for my "Pagans for Peace" project (and join me for a few minutes at some time between 8 and 11 PM on Sunday, wherever you are, to meditate-clear for peace), and here for my bindrune kit-bag. I also strongly recommend learning how to flame, ground and shield, do alternate nostril breathing, work with colour, and see also here and be flexible.

Post No. 733 - The Battle for the Soul of Australia

I recently did something I don't often do: watch some television. Even more rarely, I actually listened to an ad (mainly because I forgot to mute it), one for an SBS programme called "Go Back to Where You Come From", which aims to educate xenophobic people by showing them the conditions that refugees come from - which suffers from the dual flaws of assuming that all xenophobes (a) have compassion buried somewhere in them, but accessible by the experiences of the programme (I think it is buried much deeper than that), and (b) don't know this already. At any rate, during the ad a xenophobe accuses a whistleblower, someone who had brought out the truth about Australia's abuse of children and other asylum seekers, of being a traitor.

It was all a bit (stereotypical) teenagers squabbling in the schoolyard, as so much TV is, but ... in the sense that the xenophobe - who has been stirring up quite a bit of attention her small-minded self of late - meant, I also am a traitor to "Australia" - specifically, I am a traitor to her xenophobic Australia, an Australia that is so fearful, insecure and small-minded that it has no compassion, hospitality or caring for anyone else. Two of my ancestors were shipped out from Ireland in the early 1800s for "defending their mother's honour against some English soldiers" (i.e., stopping them from raping her), and they were renowned for their hospitality and welcoming of travellers and strangers (including indigenous people). In general, I suspect the Irish traditions of hospitality contributed to the Australians view of ourselves in the 1800s and early 1900s as a welcoming people (flawed though that was, with the notorious White Australia policy that, infamously, contributed to South Africa's apartheid policy), a view still surviving in the view of us as being "neighbourly" .. which is not, and often has not been, true.

The Australia I support is truly generous, welcoming and compassionate - truly "neighbourly", but in a sense that is not focused on the small, one that looks at all humanity (actually, all life) and has room in it's heart to say to the small numbers of refugees who reach us "I acknowledge and am touched by your suffering: let me heal you". The xenophobe is traitor to that Australia.

It all brought to mind a problem I've observed in this battle of late: those who are advocating for refugees know it is important - vital even, and it is: a battle for Australia's soul - but they do not have the eloquence and/or awareness to say that, or to talk of spiritual principles (sadly, those are often either confused for religious principles, or ridiculed). We have no Martin Luther Kings here - or even people who can overcome their emotion enough to come up with a riposte along the lines of the one I just wrote about.

The situation is, ironically, better in the case of the battle for LGBTIQ rights: there, advocates have known that we need to build support by educating people - which was a key part of the reforms I was part of in the late 1990s. There was no focus on marches and demonstrations and numbers, which is a flaw I find too many activists have: there had to be a focus on educating people. Now, both sides think it is a case of big numbers in public demonstrations, whereas it has to be more than that.

Numbers will demonstrate what people think, but that isn't necessarily right. The letter writing campaigns of Amnesty International, for example, are not based on "numbers in the street": they are based on issues, and what is right - and have been remarkably successful.

If numbers in the street were the sole issue, we would not have had anti-discrimination legislation passed in the 1970s.

In the case of recent demonstrations on this issue, as I wrote above, the behaviour has been deplorable, and both sides have been focusing on numbers to put pressure on politicians. The media has been publishing the comments of the xenophobes, but I haven't seen any cogent arguments against xenophobia in the media. I don't know whether that is because the media is choosing not to publish them, or such arguments are not being made, or a combination of those and perhaps other reasons.

In any case, most such arguments are based what is effective for the speaker, not the listener. Arguments about spiritual principles and human rights and human values such as compassion sway me, but they don't sway the xenophobes. If Australia is to become a better nation, arguments on this issue have to be addressed to the listener.

As an example, I know many blue collar xenophobes fear the loss of jobs. When that issue is raised, those advocating for refugees have often been quite glib - e.g., oh they only take jobs few people in Australia want to do anyway. Yes, and it those people who are feeling the threat of competition by people who are desperate enough to accept lesser work conditions. The issue is a valid concern, and needs to be addressed. How about pointing out that many refugees are actually quite educated people, and if Australia was less discriminatory towards such people they would be able to spread throughout the workforce and thus not get forced into competing for jobs that the poorly educated (and that is a reflection on the limited vision of our education system and the politician's who fund it, not the people themselves - for instance, get ridding of tech schools in Victoria was a mistake) find themselves having to compete for.

Then there is the fear over security - sovereignty. Well, leaving aside for the moment the issue of "which Australia?" that I raised above, and the sovereignty of humanity and of life, counter this with facts. Perhaps something along the lines of - with relation to fears around terrorism, for instance - the number of Australian born terrorists vs. the number that come here from overseas, the discrimination and abuse which forces those people into terrorism, the FACT that the majority of refugees are not terrorists, the facts that the majority of people illegally in Australia come in via airports (if that is true - I don't know what the current and recent numbers are), etc.

What about fears of changing the nature of Australian society? Well:
  1. change is inevitable - look at the changes brought about by the Internet and technology advances in recent decades: a better approach is to manage the change, not try to stop it; 
  2. some changes are good - for instance, anti-sexism laws allowing women to keep working after they are married (and the better coffees - initially in Melbourne, but now spreading through the rest of Australia) as a result of the European influx to Australia after World War Part Two
  3. some changes are bad, for sure - for instance, the change in Australia away from hospitality towards xenophobia.
What about the view that people should stay where they are - for instance, fight against Da'esh? Well:
  1. I'm still here, fighting the xenophobes; 
  2. that view ignores the reality that people have ALWAYS been mobile - starting with the initial movement out of Africa tens of thousands of years ago, and continuing with the movement of Europeans to Australia over the last few hundred years; 
  3. if I had kids, I also would want to get them out of conflict zones; 
  4. the fact that people want to come here is an acknowledge of the economic advantages (there are depressingly few social advantages nowadays) of Australia, and has to be managed in a way that does not destroy those advantages - which the current xenophobia is doing, by destroying Australia's soul.
In terms of people in Australia turning to terrorism, how about finding out why they do that, rather than making assumptions? A big issue here is that Australia's current predominant lifestyle continues to alienate so many people - and the solution is not to slag off at people about them being party poopers. 

How about countering such arguments with the value of mostly young refugees on Australia's ageing population problem? Or even raise the issue directly of the sort of Australia we want?

I don't consider my arguments to be necessarily good in terms of trying to change xenophobes, but someone has to make an effort on this, so I'll start the ball rolling ... with my very small audience. * SIGH *

This is a battle which has been going on for the last couple of hundred years, beginning with the violent white invasion of Australia, going through the struggles against racism and for worker's rights, the social progressiveness and economic disaster of the Whitlam government in the early 1970s (which helped, as much as the social upheaval of the 1960s, in breaking us out of the "white picket fence" mentality of Australia in the 1950s), the gross materialism and greed of the 1980s, and the politics of fear introduced by the evil John Howard in the 1990s and continued by far too many politicians since then.

It is a battle which needs to be fought and won in every generation - after all, the fight against slavery has been going for several millennia, and against racism for centuries, and they are still going - partly because of the basic them of this post: that activists fail to aim their work at the audience, and also because of denial - thinking that once something has been done (such as the various instruments of anti-discrimination legislation), it does not need to be addressed again. (Mind you, given my utter exhaustion after having been involved in such work, I have sympathy for those who do make the latter mistake.)

It is, at its heart, a battle for spirituality.

I may post more on this topic over time ...

Here are a couple of other links which might be of interest:


[1] BPLF = Balanced Positive (spiritual) Light Forces. See here and here for more on this.
[2] Please see here, here and my post "The Death of Wikipedia" for the reasons I now recommend caution when using Wikipedia. I'm also exploring use of h2g2, although that doesn't appear to be as extensive (h2g2 is intended - rather engagingly - to be the Earth edition of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy").
[3] I apologise for the formatting: it seems Blogger is no longer as WYSIWYG as it used to be, and there are a lot of unwanted changes to layout made upon publishing, so I often have to edit it immediately after publishing to get the format as close to what I want as possible.
Love, light, hugs and blessings
Gnwmythr, Pagan Energy Worker, Wéofodthegn
(pronounced "new-MYTH-ear"; ... aka Bellatrix Lux … aka Morinehtar … would-be drýicgan or maga ... )
My "blogiography" (list of all posts and guide as to how to best use this site) is here, and my glossary/index is here.

I started this blog to cover karmic regression-rescue (see here and here), and it grew ... See here for my group mind project, here and here for my "Pagans for Peace" project (and join me for a few minutes at some time between 8 and 11 PM on Sunday, wherever you are, to meditate-clear for peace), and here for my bindrune kit-bag. I also strongly recommend learning how to flame, ground and shield, do alternate nostril breathing, work with colour, and see also here and be flexible.

I am a Walker upon the Path of Balanced Positivity, seeking Spiritual Maturity.
  • Neither eloquence nor inarticulateness inherently indicates correctness, but, as words can kill, the right to freedom of speech comes with a DUTY to be as well-informed, objective and balanced as you can be.
  • Gnwmythr's Stropping Strap: Occam's Razor only works if  the simplest solution is actually recognised as being the simplest, rather than the one that best fits one's bigotries being labelled 'simplest'.
  • I mourn the desecration of the term 'Light Worker' by commercial interests, and the warping of the word 'Light' away from 'Clear Light' by the "(Fluffy) White Lighters".
  • Presuming that everyone has, or wants, a smartphone is discriminatory, unspiritual, and downright stupid.
  • Obsessive love may be a cover up of guilt.
  • Proxy embarrassment is both a form of control, and an internal barrier to truth, honesty and perspicacity.
  • Our entire life experience, with all the many wondrous and varied people, places and events in it, is too small a sample for statistical reliability about Life.
  • Notwithstanding the greatness of exploring the world and humanity, the greatest exploration is of mind, spirit and Soul.
  • May the world of commerce and business be recognised to be a servant, not a master, of the lives of people.
  • Life is not a struggle for status. 
  • Being accustomed to interacting via certain rules makes those rules neither right nor universal.
  • Like fire to the physical, emotions to the soul make a good servant, and a bad master.
  • The means shape the end.
  • My favourite action movie of all time is "Gandhi", although I've recently come across "Invictus" and might put that one in to that category. However, I loathe the stereotypical action movie - and, for similar reasons, I loathe many dramas, which are often emotionally violent, more so in some cases than many war films.
  • All of the above - and this blog - could be wrong, or subject to context, perspective, or state of spiritual evolution ... and blogging has been described as graffiti with punctuation :)
Human dignity is the inherently cumulative holistic combination of human rights, wellbeing and potential, and all actions or interaction which promote, realise or facilitate same. The converse also applies: whatever degrades, diminishes or robs humans of dignity, is inherently undignified.
Gnwmythr
The “purpose” of spiritual evolution is not the attainment of “spiritual perfection” - not in the sense of not having to evolve further, at any rate, since there is no such thing. We need to evolve in order to grow - but we can take rest breaks (hopefully well earned :) ) along the way. No, the “purpose” of evolution is, rather, to perfect our ability to learn, and thus grow.
Gnwmythr
Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Females, get over 'cute'. Get competent. Get trained. Get capable. Get over 'cute'. And those of you who are called Patty and Debby and Suzy, get over that. Because we use those names to infantalise females – we keep females in their 'little girl' state by the names we use for them. Get over it. If you want to be taken seriously, get serious.
Jane Elliott
The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good [people] to do nothing.
(based on writing by) Edmund Burke
We didn't inherit the Earth from our ancestors, we only borrowed it from our children
Antoine De Saint-Exupéry
There are risks and costs to a program of action. But they are far less than the long-range risks and costs of comfortable inaction.
John F. Kennedy
Tags:attitudes, change, discrimination, education, racism, refugees, society,
First published: Tysdagr, 28th July, 2015
Last edited (excluding fixing typo's and other minor matters): Tuesday, 28th July, 2015

Sunday, 26 July 2015

Post No. 732 – Psychic Weather Report No. 0038



There is an introduction / reminder / explanation about these posts here (and also see here for some investigation into evidence of the effectiveness of this type of work, which shows variability [and mentions causes] and cycles in the energetic/consciousness response). I have a simplified blogiography of posts related to this work here, a list of themes I have identified here, and my changing the personality of oppressors post, which I am contemplating expanding to include some key people to work on, is here. It is also worth contemplating that one of the greatest weaknesses of those who oppose Balanced Positivity is the inherent pain, suffering and negativity of their aims and means – from the personal slights, insults and traumas left by the petty tyrant, autocrat, dictator/monarch or the ruthless (some at least are not; some are BPLF) oligarch or politician, through the social dislocation of the economic ideologue to the long-lasting trauma, injury, death and desolation of society caused by those who use violence or war as a means to achieve power or impose their will. It may take time, but people WILL eventually realise what is not good, and will take action – which is why slavery is no longer ubiquitous, and why the march to freedom and democracy is underway – tentatively, and with backsliding and mistakes along the way, but inexorable nevertheless.
Also, as you read this, consider this: how does one outflank an idea, or attack an emotion in the rear? It is as well to consider what those who are unbalanced could do to good ideas and emotions, as well as considering BPLF ways to outflank or ‘attack in the rear’ bad ideas/emotions.
As a first point, it is also recommended that you read yesterday’s summation of world events. The key themes were:
(a) based on my interpretation of information here and here with Jupiter in Leo contributing to an expansion of opinions, beliefs and perceptions (until 11th August, 2015), Saturn in Sagittarius contributing to finding an authentic balance (until 20th December, 2017), Uranus in Aries contributing to fresh and possibly radical starts (until some date in the Year 2018), and Pluto in Capricorn contributing to a transformation of power and business (and careers) (until some date in the Year 2024), conditions are ripe for a change for the better in world politics;
(b) tragedies can lead to some good outcomes;
(c) economic influence is excessive when it impedes sovereignty;
(d) extremists are not only using social media, they are learning from the mistakes of their predecessors, and thus flexibility in approaches to them will be needed (I think von Clausewitz had something to say on this …);
(e) accountability may be slowly improving – and visibility of problems is often a key first step, so a proper media is vital, just as self knowledge is vital on a personal level;
(f) justice remains important for a functional society: so does social equity and inclusiveness – all of which is countered by having oligarchies;
(g) our commitment to BPLF principles is measured by how we hold to them in challenging times and circumstances;
(h) refugees can have positive benefits for nations – e.g., addressing ageing problems;
(i) Putin’s Russia may not be as much of a threat as it has seemed;
(j) actions often speak louder than words;
(k) the more things change, the more they stay the same. I know of engineers who left the profession when faxes increased the pace of life, and past advances in technology have led to concerns, some valid, most not. Throughout all this, however, the constant requiring attention, and often ignored, is human frailties, foibles and weaknesses;
(l) the closer, longer and more extreme that violence is encountered, the more hardline some people become - but NOT ALL.
From my runic and other divination:
  • the BPLF non-physical energies that are being sent to the planet this week are those shown by the rune Beorc / Berkana, acting through the Airy Magickal Law of Distance, which amounts to nurturing connections to people and places further away (note the caution on this from the Yi Jing). Wherever these energies are low, they need to be strengthened;
  • the non-physical energies needing to be cleared are those shown by the rune Ing / Inguz, acting through the Watery Magickal Law of Frequency, which amounts to (a) exacerbating inner conflicts amongst the BPLF, and (b) continuing last week’s quest for reinforcements.
This week’s Yi Jing (formerly called the I Ching; I use Sam Reifler’s 1974 book, pub. Bantam, ISBN 0-553-11789-0; I use his modern coins method) for the coming week was:
No. 17 – Swee (Following)
Thunder rests in the marsh.
In the evening the superior man
goes home to rest.
Great success.
No mistakes
if you keep to your course
Moving line no. 1 (my BPLF Guides have a sense of humour: as I started to look up the interpretation of this moving line, the document I was typing in started to scroll through itself – moving lines indeed :) ):
The man turns from his pursuit
and follows something else.
If he goes beyond his own gate
in search of followers,
he will be honoured.
Auspicious
If you keep to your course.
Moving line no. 4:
He attracts followers.
Ominous
if you keep to your course.
If you make your intentions clear,
how can you make a mistake?
This talks of the necessity to be able to rest, which requires “followers” – or, more accurately in this instance, allies – who will continue the work while one rests. There is, however, a warning to be careful of such people: do not be too trusting, do not give them more than can handle, and test them or use whatever BPLF means you know work to be 100% sure that they are capable before giving them as assignment. There’s nothing worse than coming back from rest to a great crisis …
This also talks of the importance of honest communication from you to your allies, and of the need to be single-minded, or dedicated – perhaps persistent, if the best word.
From http://www.cafeastrology.com/thismonthinastrology.html, there is an emphasis on following one’s heart, and being mindful of one’s responsibilities towards the outside world, but our foundations need to be looked after, and our loves reviewed.
I have not done the “extras” this week to help the focus on the work from Wednesday to Friday.
I no longer type up a list of places with most/least of energy - you can get that most effectively from the images showing the development of the contours for this week’s assessment:
Overall, there is a strong ridge of BPLF energy extending from Central and North America through the Atlantic to Europe, with a sub-ridges or shelves of BPLF energy extending from South America through the South Atlantic Ocean to Southern Africa, and through Russia to East Asia. Local highs of BPLF energy over East Asia and Australia.
There is a ridge of high nonBPLF energy from Central Africa through the Middle east to Central Asia and India, and a high concentration of nonBPLF energy over Central America (where BPLF energy is highest, this week). There is trough of nonBPLF energy through South America and the North Atlantic Ocean which is stopping the high in Central America connecting to the ridge emanating from Central Africa. There is also a trough of low nonBPLF energy from the Indian Ocean to South East Asia.
Last week’s work seems to have been particularly effective in Europe, North America, Central America and the North Atlantic Ocean. Resistance to last week’s work seems to have been highest in Central Africa, and the nonBPLF appear to have, in effect, “mounted a counter attack” in the Middle East.
In the same way that I want to make the Shield of Hope a permanent region of BPLF energy, I suspect the nonBPLF wants to do their version of that with the Middle East and Central Africa – and perhaps also Northern Africa, and Central and South America. The nonBPLF has, in some cases, spent decades fomenting trouble, turmoil and suffering in those places.
My approach this week will be:
  • Sunday
     - invoke Æther and Beorc / Berkana ;
     - clear nonBPLF units, particularly those of doubt/confusion and nonBPLF reinforcement, from, and send BPLF energy, particularly nurturing connections with people and places distant, to the North and South Atlantic Oceans and the Indian Ocean;
     - invoke Water and Eihwaz / Eoh for balance, and then devoke;
  • Monday
     - invoke Fire and Gear / Jera;
     - clear nonBPLF units, particularly those of despair, fatalism (particularly about those who are distant) and nonBPLF reinforcement, from, and send BPLF energy, particularly passion, to, Southern and Central Africa - both directly, and from the reserve in the North and South Atlantic Oceans and the Indian Ocean;
     - invoke Air and Peorth / Perthro for balance, and then devoke;
  • Tuesday (building up BPLF reserves)
    - invoke Æther and Beorc / Berkana ;
     - clear nonBPLF units, particularly those of doubt/confusion and nonBPLF reinforcement, from, and send BPLF energy, particularly nurturing connections with people and places distant, to South America, Europe and the Mediterranean Sea, and East and South Asia and Australia - directly, and from the reserve in the North and South Atlantic Oceans and the Indian Ocean, worked on previously (making sure no depletion occurs);
     - invoke Water and Eihwaz / Eoh for balance, and then devoke;
  • Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday
    - invoke Æther and Beorc / Berkana ;
     - clear nonBPLF units, particularly those of doubt/confusion and nonBPLF reinforcement, from, and send BPLF energy, particularly nurturing connections with people and places distant, to the Middle East - directly, from the reserve in the North and South Atlantic Oceans and the Indian Ocean, and from Europe and the Mediterranean Sea and East Asia, worked on previously (making sure no depletion occurs);
     - invoke Water and Eihwaz / Eoh for balance, and then devoke;
  •  Saturday
    - invoke Æther and Beorc / Berkana ;
     - clear nonBPLF units, particularly those of doubt/confusion and nonBPLF reinforcement, from, and send BPLF energy, particularly nurturing connections with people and places distant, to Central America and the Pacific - directly, from the reserve in the North and South Atlantic Oceans and the Indian Ocean, and from South America and East and South East Asia and Australia, worked on previously (making sure no depletion occurs);
     - invoke Water and Eihwaz / Eoh for balance, and then devoke;
Irrespective of this assessment, however, please join us in trying to make sure that the Shield of Hope area formed by (part or all of) the South Atlantic Ocean, Southern and Eastern Africa (including both sources of the Nile), the Indian sub-continent (including the Himalayas) and the Indian Ocean, shown outlined in gold on this week’s energy map, consistently has BPLF energy at or above 7 by the time Neptune leaves Pisces, on around 30th March, 2025 (a date which has an eclipse the day before). If you wish to do a little more coordinated action on a positive strategic front, I'm also planning on routinely sending BPLF energy to Hong Kong, Tunisia, and Mexico, which show potential as "outposts of the BPLF” and I wish to encourage their change for the better, and through the Red Sea and Suez Canal to the Mediterranean Sea and the Black Sea.

[1] BPLF = Balanced Positive (spiritual) Light Forces. See here and here for more on this. 
[2] Please see here, here and my post "The Death of Wikipedia" for the reasons I now recommend caution when using Wikipedia. I'm also exploring use of h2g2, although that doesn't appear to be as extensive (h2g2 is intended - rather engagingly - to be the Earth edition of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy").
[3] I apologise for the formatting: it seems Blogger is no longer as WYSIWYG as it used to be, and there are a lot of unwanted changes to layout made upon publishing, so I often have to edit it immediately after publishing to get the format as close to what I want as possible.

Love, light, hugs and blessings
(pronounced "new-MYTH-ear"; ... aka Bellatrix Lux … aka Morinehtar … would-be drýicgan or maga ... )
My "blogiography" (list of all posts and guide as to how to best use this site) is here, and my glossary/index is here.

I started this blog to cover karmic regression-rescue (see here and here), and it grew ... See here for my group mind project, here and here for my "Pagans for Peace" project (and join me for a few minutes at some time between 8 and 11 PM on Sunday, wherever you are, to meditate-clear for peace), and here for my bindrune kit-bag. I also strongly recommend learning how to flame, ground and shield, do alternate nostril breathing, work with colour, and see also here and be flexible.
 
Tags: activism, discrimination, energy work, magick, meditation, nonviolence, peace, psychic weather, society, violence, war,

First published: Sunnudagr, 19th July, 2015
Last edited (excluding fixing typo's and other minor matters): Sunday, 19th July, 2015


Saturday, 25 July 2015

Post No. 731 – For Sunday evening’s meditation-clearing



For everyone’s convenience, I’ve shifted the reminders / explanations about Sunday’s meditation-clearing to this post. I have a simplified blogiography of posts related to this work here, a list of themes I have identified here, and my changing the personality of oppressors post, which I am contemplating expanding to include some key people to work on, is here. (Also, see here for some investigation into evidence of the effectiveness of this type of work, which shows variability [and mentions causes] and cycles in the energetic/consciousness response.)

The purpose of posting these news links is not only to inform: it is also to stimulate a connection to nonBPLF units that need to be cleared and BPLF units that need to be strengthened. That only works if you don’t let yourself be overwhelmed by this, so take it in small chunks if you need to, but remember to actively clear and heal! … including yourself.

Also, in the same way that activists used to argue that “the personal is political”, the energies we use and manifest in our daily lives contribute to the larger soup of energies that influence world events. If you want to, for example, improve the communication of nations, improve yours. To help stop abuses of power, be always ethical in your conduct. Want peace? Then work in an informed, understanding, intelligent and nuanced way for peace in yourself and your life.

Now, the themes – short, medium and long term - that come to mind for my work this week, after I review all this news, are (and no apologies if this repeats the themes of any previous weeks – in fact, given the size of this task, that is to be expected):
(a) based on my interpretation of information here and here with Jupiter in Leo contributing to an expansion of opinions, beliefs and perceptions (until 11th August, 2015), Saturn in Sagittarius contributing to finding an authentic balance (until 20th December, 2017), Uranus in Aries contributing to fresh and possibly radical starts (until some date in the Year 2018), and Pluto in Capricorn contributing to a transformation of power and business (and careers) (until some date in the Year 2024), conditions are ripe for a change for the better in world politics;
(b) tragedies can lead to some good outcomes;
(c) economic influence is excessive when it impedes sovereignty;
(d) extremists are not only using social media, they are learning from the mistakes of their predecessors, and thus flexibility in approaches to them will be needed (I think von Clausewitz had something to say on this …);
(e) accountability may be slowly improving – and visibility of problems is often a key first step, so a proper media is vital, just as self knowledge is vital on a personal level;
(f) justice remains important for a functional society: so does social equity and inclusiveness – all of which is countered by having oligarchies;
(g) our commitment to BPLF principles is measured by how we hold to them in challenging times and circumstances;
(h) refugees can have positive benefits for nations – e.g., addressing ageing problems;
(i) Putin’s Russia may not be as much of a threat as it has seemed;
(j) actions often speak louder than words;
(k) the more things change, the more they stay the same. I know of engineers who left the profession when faxes increased the pace of life, and past advances in technology have led to concerns, some valid, most not. Throughout all this, however, the constant requiring attention, and often ignored, is human frailties, foibles and weaknesses;
(l) the closer, longer and more extreme that violence is encountered, the more hardline some people become - but NOT ALL.
News and other matters from this week include the following (opportunities/good news are shown in green; comments are shown in purple; WARNING: some of these links may contain triggers around issues such as violence, sexual assault, discrimination, etc).
  • permanent issue: may all actual and potential BPLF [1] Leaders be kept BPLF safe, including keeping them undetectable to the nonBPLF and keeping all their Significant Others inviolable against being used for indirect psychic attack, all as is for the Highest Spiritual Good;
  • with regard to Da’esh and violent extremism generally:   an unofficial alliance between the Syrian government and the Kurds against Da’esh in Hasakeh Province, Syria;   a suicide bombing in Iraq has killed 130 people;   at least 30 mostly young activists have been killed and more than 100 injured by a bombing in Turkey, following which Turkey plans to tighten security on its Syrian border, and has attacked Da’esh in Syria and agreed to allow US planes to operate from Turkey. The bombing was condemned by the UN Secretary-General, who said no grievance justifies targeting civilians;   more than 20 people have been killed by a Boko Haram attack in Cameroon;   concerns that Kuwait’s requirement for all residents to compulsorily give DNA samples violates the right to personal privacy;   in Australia, a battle is brewing between telecommunications companies and the Federal Government over further national security laws;   concerning evidence that Da’esh may be becoming a functional state;   a Kurdish terrorist organisation, the PKK, has killed 2 police officers in Turkey – which does nothing helpful for the creation of a Kurdish state!;   criticism of the British PM’s response to violent extremism, which has exposed Muslims to Islamophobia – and see also here;   an analysis indicates Da’esh’s use of chemical weapons is out of frustration;   some valid criticism of Australia’s “de-radicalisation” programme;   an analysis of Da’esh’s claimed influence in the Caucasus;   the importance of achieving “a solution” in Syria in order to defeat Da’esh;   dozens have been killed in bombings in Gombe, Nigeria;   this is disturbing;   an analysis of the funding of violent extremist organisations – for instance, the allegation that Da’esh sells narcotics;   a review of counter-terrorism in Pakistan, with recommendations;   a call to beware of politicians making themselves look big by inflating security threats;
  • with regard to democracy, freedom and governance:   the UN Human Rights Office said a draft law adopted by the Cambodian Senate threatens the existence of a free and independent civil society in the country and the crucial work that NGOs carry out on development, governance, and human rights;   the Kenyan government has attacked human rights groups;   concerns over Burundi’s coming Presidential elections;   on Burundi, the UN Secretary-General took note of the indefinite suspension of the inter-Burundian dialogue that started on 14th July 2015 under the facilitation of Uganda without an agreement being reached on a range of issues that would have contributed to the creation of a climate conducive to the holding of credible and peaceful elections, as contained in the relevant recommendations of the East African Community and the African Union. In this worrisome context, and following the decision of the Burundian Government to hold the presidential election today, the Secretary-General calls on the authorities to do all in their power to ensure security and a peaceful atmosphere during the election. He further calls on all parties to refrain from any acts of violence that could compromise the stability of Burundi and the region – sadly, there have been deaths. The UN noted the elections appeared to have been peaceful, and this report says the current President has won a (illegal, apparently) third term;   a call for the (Australian) political position of Speaker to be truly independent;   the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) welcomed the establishment of the Electoral System Reform Commission by the National Unity Government;   a review of the oligarchy of Ukraine;   a call for Australia to create a national anti-corruption commission;   a review of the state of democracy in Burma;  this analysis of politics in Australia is brilliant, and this exchange shows, perhaps, how politics should be conducted – and is behaviour I am now far too worn out, tired and generally damaged (in a word: grumpy!) to do, which is one of many reasons why I will never seek to be a Parliamentarian;  a clash between legality and politics;   the fight against investor-state disputes undermining nations’ sovereignty;
  • with regard to crime, judicial matters and policing:   plain-clothes police officers raided the northern Johannesburg house of outspoken constitutional rights crusader Hugh Glenister without a warrant last week, jumping over his garden wall and smashing through doors inside his property;   an assessment of the issue of police “body cameras”;   two men have been charged with attempted murder of a police officer (in Melbourne);  a quest in the USA for a way out of police-community hostility;   a small step towards a more effective drug policy in the USA;   an editorial on excessive use of the death penalty by India’s lower courts, with around 5% of those verdicts being confirmed, resulting in needless, avoidable suffering on death row;   an allegation that witnesses in a trial of police who allegedly killed 20 woodcutters have been threatened;   a woman in India has alleged harassment from a police inspector led to her suicide attempt;   in India, the Mysuru City Police, which has launched a crackdown on private money lenders collecting exorbitant rate of interest, has now started a farmers’ helpline;   a call for Cambodian authorities to immediately exonerate and unconditionally release 11 opposition activists convicted after an unfair trial;   an interesting review of upper courts and recent situations in India;   in response to unabated illegal activities, including skill game parlours, money laundering, matka, prostitution and cricket betting, Indian Special Branch officers will keep an eye on other “jurisdictional” police;   in South Africa, the General Council of the Bar (GCB) has admitted that efforts to transform the judiciary have failed, and will establish a transformation committee to monitor transformation progress in its constituent bars;   a call for Lebanon to focus on justice, not revenge (in the form of executions – my change of wording);
  • with regard to human rights and discrimination:   the LGBT community in Tunisia is gaining some ground in the battle for rights;   staggering results from a survey of male and female on-line game players;   the connection between homelessness and family violence;   the connection between self-control to achieve success when one is part of a disadvantaged group and damage to health (which I can personally verify);   Italy is found to violate the rights of same gender couples;   a differently abled man in India has petitioned for assistance to find employment or set up a business (and a campaign for improved accessibility has started in Chennai, India);   an Aboriginal outstation in remote Arnhem Land is preparing to open its own school that blends Indigenous and western teaching, rejecting Australian Commonwealth government moves to force children to larger towns;   bisexuality is not a phase (nor is being a lesbian, as some dipsticks I know have claimed);   same sex parents are OK;   some homophobic bigots in Kenya have tried to hijack media coverage of Obama’s visit;   a call to eliminate homophobia, rather trying to eliminate homosexuality;   harassment, discrimination, and the threat of violence colour the everyday lives of LGBT people in Kazakhstan;   a gun has been seized from an anti-Islam protestor in Australia;   a court has banned five Chelsea fans from all soccer matches for up to five years over an incident of racism in Paris in February;   a move for more “women’s police stations” in India;
  • with regard to media and freedom of expression:   a Burmese court has fined two journalists for allegedly defaming the President;   a call for Western journalists to give voice to repressed, marginalised and increasingly muzzled Egyptians;   an opinion piece asking what has happened to the Tahrir revolutionary spirit and why have Egypt's 'liberals' forsaken the values they profess?;   3 Spanish journalists may have been kidnapped in Syria;
  • with regard to refugees:   the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported that the number of Iraqis internally displaced by the conflict is now over 3.1 million people. Fighting in Anbar Governorate has caused the new displacement of nearly 300,000 people from Ramadi district since April;   the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) said that weeks after the elections in Nigeria, violence and attacks are causing hundreds to flee to Cameron and Niger;   a critique of the European response to the migration crisis in the Mediterranean which finds it is inadequate;   an article arguing that refugees to Germany could offset its ageing population problem;   an investigation into Australia’s inability to provide adequate health care for detained refuges;
  • with regard to overcrowding and “modern” lifestyle issues:   a road rage attack – a form of behaviour I consider symptomatic of overcrowding and stress - in Melbourne has resulted in the death of a man;   a questioning of the approach of living life in debt;
  • with regard to education:   dozens of students at a school were caned by a teacher before his colleagues restrained him. Following protests by parents and students, a probe has been ordered;   this is disturbing;   a shortage of teachers in South Africa;
  • with regard to the conflict in Afghanistan:   seven Afghan soldiers have been killed by NATO in a “friendly fire” incident;   the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) welcomed the establishment of the Electoral System Reform Commission by the National Unity Government;   the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) has condemned the bombing in the northern province of Faryab, which has killed at least 19 civilians and injured some 28 others;   a warning of the dangers of tax evasion (I would add that what is happening in Greece now is a perfect example of that);
  • with regard to China:   concerns over China’s actions in the South China Seas, which “show another face” different to it’s claimed “peaceful rise” and may have driven nations closer to the USA;   China may shed its one child policy to address its ageing population problem;
  • with regard to the conflict in Iraq:   an article alleging the USA and Iran are cooperating, and working through proxies, in the assault on Fallujah;   a suicide bombing has killed 130 people. and another bombing at least 30;   the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported that the number of Iraqis internally displaced by the conflict is now over 3.1 million people. Fighting in Anbar Governorate has caused the new displacement of nearly 300,000 people from Ramadi district since April;
  • with regard to Russia:   a review of Mr Putin’s foreign policies, which suggests Russia and Mr Putin are weaker than it seems – for instance, Russia’s energy earnings depend on Ukraine, but Russia’s invasion (my wording) of eastern Ukraine and the Crimea have led to sanctions which have weakened Russia: “While Putin will likely hold on to power, maybe even for two full presidential (6 year) terms, his domestic support is conditional on his strength externally. These external adventures are weak and hollow. Lucky for him, so are the West’s resistance to confronting him and reliance on sanctions that likely won’t change his behaviour”;   internal attacks in rebel areas of eastern Ukraine may lead Russia to realise what a can of worms it has created;
  • with regard to the conflict in Syria:   an unofficial alliance between the Syrian government and the Kurds against Da’esh in Hasakeh Province;   the UN Special Envoy for Syria, Staffan de Mistura, has held talks in China and Egypt, and in Iran, and has expressed deep concern over the situation of the civilian population in the town of Zabadani, which has been barrel bombed, leading to retaliation by opposition forces: in both cases, civilians are tragically caught in the middle of the fighting, and the Special Envoy called on all parties to uphold the principle of the protection of civilians, and he again called on the Syrian Government to halt the use of crude and indiscriminate weapons, such as barrel bombs, on its own cities;   a disturbing article on the plight of children in Aleppo and Syria;   flaws in the British perspective on Syria;   the importance of achieving “a solution” in Syria in order to defeat Da’esh;   the UN Special Envoy for Syria, Staffan de Mistura, visited Damascus has discussed the preliminary findings of the Geneva Consultations and the preparations for next week’s Security Council debate on Syria with Deputy Prime Minister and Foreign Minister Walid Mouallem and Deputy Foreign Minister Faisal Mekdad;
  • with regard to the conflict in eastern Ukraine:   a review of the oligarchy of Ukraine;   internal attacks in rebel areas of eastern Ukraine may lead Russia to realise what a can of worms it has created;
  • with regard to the war in Yemen:   the first World Food Programme (WFP) ship carrying food assistance has arrived in Aden this week – the first WFP-chartered ship to berth at the port since conflict erupted in Yemen in March, but suffering and problems still continues;   the UK has been helping the Saudis with their bombing campaign in Yemen;   an analysis of the possibility of Yemen’s government rebuilding the nation and its legitimacy;   the Houthis are repressing activists, citizens and journalists;
  • with regard to the natural and other catastrophes :   at least 19 people have been killed after a boat collided with a barge and capsized on the Nile river;   the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs says that heavy monsoon rains, rapid snow melting and flooding from glacial lakes in the past week have led to flooding in various locations across Pakistan, particularly in the north-west, and Chitral District has been badly hit, with an estimated 285,000 people affected. The exact number of people injured is difficult to determine, due to the inaccessibility of many affected areas. Overall, six casualties have been reported, 292 villages flooded and nearly 400 houses damaged. The Pakistani Government and security forces are providing immediate help. The UN is monitoring the situation and stands ready to assist should it be requested. Also, seasonal rains have caused heavy flooding throughout the Sagaing region of Myanmar, with some 70,000 people have been affected by the floods in 11 townships, with nine people having died and more than 12,000 houses having been damaged. Local authorities, the Union Government, the military, the Myanmar Red Cross Society (MRCS) and local civil society organizations are providing food, water and other basic necessities to those affected, and the United Nations is part of a joint team currently visiting the worst affected areas to assess the situation and humanitarian needs. The UN has offered support and stands ready to assist response efforts in Sagaing;   health partners working with UN agencies in Somalia have voiced concern over the scaling down of life-saving health services due to funding shortages;
Also from the Daily Briefings of the United Nations (UN) (and other sources):
  • the UN Special Coordinator for the Middle East Peace Process, Nickolay Mladenov, has warned that support for the two-state solution among both Palestinians and Israelis is fading away;
  • the United Nations Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) has strongly condemned the marked increase of armed attacks on the Main Supply Road 1 (MSR1) attributable to members of the rebel group Front démocratique du peuple centrafricain (FDPC);
  • in South Sudan, the World Health Organization (WHO) has reported that more than 1,210 cholera cases, including 39 deaths, have been reported, mostly in Juba and Bor Counties;
  • the Secretary-General is concerned about the plan announced by the Israeli Government to demolish properties of the herding community in Susiya, placing dozens of civilians at risk of further displacement;
  • the UN Mission in Mali, has condemned a mortar attack on its camp in Aguelhok;
  • health partners working with UN agencies in Somalia have voiced concern over the scaling down of life-saving health services due to funding shortages;
  • the World Health Organization has welcomed the European Medicines Agency’s positive review of the efficacy, quality and safety of a malaria vaccine, calling it a major milestone for malaria vaccine development;
From other sites:
  • Human Rights Watch also has:   a report that Israeli security forces have been abusive of Palestinian children, and called for the killing of a fleeing boy by an Israeli colonel to be properly investigated;   Egyptian security forces appear to have forcibly disappeared dozens of people;   thirteen people who were detained in the course of an unprecedented nationwide attack on human rights lawyers remain in police custody incommunicado, leaving them vulnerable to torture and other abuses;   an assessment that the US Congress is concerned about human rights abuses in Central Asia;   widespread atrocities reported in the latest Government offensive in South Sudan;   the Democratic Republic of Congo has been urged to stop the crackdown on peaceful activists and political opponents;   the International Olympic Committee (IOC) should ensure that the host of the 2022 Winter Olympics (China and Kazakhstan, which have appalling human rights records, are leading the running) fully respects human rights commitments, as per the revised rules;   a call for Philippine President Benigno Aquino III to commit his administration to meaningful human rights reforms in his final State of the Nation Address on 27th July, 2015;   a call for Thailand’s national assembly to reject the nominees for the National Human Rights Commission, on the grounds that the selection process did not meet international standards;
  • the Middle East Eye also has:
     - the London-based refugee rights group Palestinian Return Centre (PRC) gained official consultative status at the United Nations on Monday, and has commenced legal action against Israel’s mission to the UN for claiming that it is connected to Hamas;
     - a survivor of Abu Ghraib during the reign of Saddam Hussein has started helping displaced Yazidis;
     - seventy years after its foundation, Jordan’s Muslim Brotherhood stands at a crossroads after an unprecedented rift has split the group;
     - an analysis of Hamas’ options following the Iranian nuclear deal, which apparently included talks on US citizens detained in Iran, and about which Gulf states are concerned;   an opinion piece asks whether the deal shows that sanctions on Israel may bring about peace between Israel and Palestine;   Gaza-based Palestinian resistance groups have become more sophisticated and organised, according to analysts;
     - an article alleging the USA and Iran are cooperating, and working through proxies, in the assault on Fallujah, Iran;
     - the Israeli military industry is reported to be changing from selling weapons to selling surveillance;
     - an analysis of recent car bombings in Gaza suggest that it is not really clear who is behind them;
     - four decades of repression of Sahrawis in Western Sahara;
     - a call for its neighbours to “rescue Egypt from itself”;
  • the US-based and -centric “War on the Rocks” blog (which I have found may also have other articles that I have concerns with - and thus do not provide links to, unless I want you to think … :) ) has:   articles on Chinese hacking here, here and here;   a rebuttal of criticism of the Iranian nuclear deal;   an analysis of the legacy of the massacre at Srebrenica;
  • the Justice in Conflict blog has:   an article on the vital role played by victim’s groups in bringing Chadian dictator Hissène Habré to trial, and a few other thoughts on the trial;   part 2 of a series on the relationship between Africa and the International Criminal Court;
  • the Political Violence at a Glance blog has:   a report that, while militias make wars longer and bloodier, negotiated settlements are possible;   a survey of former Israeli soldiers has shown that experience of intense, face to face combat leads to a decrease in support for negotiations and human rights groups;   an investigation in Africa of the assumed linkage between democracy and reduced repression found preliminarily that, “subject to a few caveats”, ”democracy reduces state repression by pacifying the opposition, rather than constraining the government”;
  • the International Crisis Group has:   a review of reform and security in Tunisia, with some very sound recommendations;   an article on “Lebanon’s self-defeating survival strategies”;
  • The Hindu also has:   an editorial on Japan’s move away from pacifism, including the US pressure to do so;   limitations are making an invitation for public comment on policy ineffective;   the USA and Cuba have now moved to normal diplomatic relations;   the UN Security Council has endorsed the proposed Iranian nuclear deal;   as the Modi Government continues to struggle with the Vyapam scandal, which resulted in candidates for courses gaining entry despite inadequate performance, it agrees to a change to a proposed Land Bill which would allow States in India to include in their laws consent of landowners and those dependent on the land and a social impact assessment before acquisition;   a call for better selection of tree species for planting in public areas;   problems with a public food distribution project;   allegations about a declining law and order situation in Bengal;   a Dalit group has thrown a firebomb at a theatre showing a film which portrayed Dalits in a poor light; the District Legal Services Authority in Karnataka will help farmers with legal notices from banks, etc;   a call for the Reserve Bank of India to be independent;
  • the BBC also has:   an investigation has shown African soccer players as young as 14 have been “trafficked” to Laos;   a surge in murders in the Brazilian city of Manaus is being investigated;   a review of the security situation in Eastern Africa;   the White House is in the "final stages" of drafting a plan to close the controversial US military prison at Guantanamo Bay;   a former Communist-era prison commander has been sentenced to 20 years in jail after being convicted of crimes against humanity in the first such trial in Romania;   outrage by some psychologists at their colleagues role in torture;   the problem of gambling in Australia, which I can vouch for, having seen someone lose their home and other problems;
  • the (South African) Mail & Guardian also has:   a report on the scandal around the security upgrade of a Minister’s residence;   plain-clothes police officers raided the northern Johannesburg house of outspoken constitutional rights crusader Hugh Glenister without a warrant last week, jumping over his garden wall and smashing through doors inside his property;   a Kenyan perspective on the forthcoming visit by US President Obama;   a claim that Africa’ Ebola epidemic has not yet run its course;   an article that South Africans must choose between blind trust and accountability;   in South Africa, the General Council of the Bar (GCB) has admitted that efforts to transform the judiciary have failed, and will establish a transformation committee to monitor transformation progress in its constituent bars;   a review suggesting US President Obama’s economic legacy in Africa – particularly Kenya and Ethiopia - could be substantial, offset by problems alleged to have been caused in Somalia, and a review of Obama’s failure over torture;   concerns over a faction in Limpopo province using the name ‘Boko Haram’;   the trial of former Chadian leader Hissène Habré is a warning to tyrants in Africa;
and from other sites: 
  • an assessment that the Iran nuclear deal may not lead to more progressive changes in Iran;
  • a review of “social media”, including the concerns that right wing groups are using it more, and a suggestion that “we need political and civil society leaders to reflect on the language that they use, and to strive for a discourse conducive to social cohesion, in order to shape a civic narrative with which we can all engage”;
  • the Philippines is planning a 25 per cent hike in its defence budget next year, mainly to bolster its claims in the disputed South China Sea; see also here, which includes China’s response and a broader assessment;
  • an assessment of society’s problematic teaching of and views towards masculinity;
  • Cold Chisel singer Jimmy Barnes has asked anti-Islam protesters to stop playing his songs at rallies (and John Farnham isn’t happy about his songs being used either), as police condemned the behaviour of both anti-Islam and anti-racism protestors (see also this analysis);
  • the Internet has been used to hack into a car and turn off its engine – leading to a recall of over a million vehicles for improved security;
  • the USA is reportedly disturbed by anti-US sentiments expressed by Iran’s religious leader after the nuclear deal;
  • a timely warning, drawing from the 1930s experience of fascism, about today’s dangerous anti-Islam movements in Australia, and a review of how the current “radical nationalist” (aka anti-Islam) movement has learned from previous movements –including aiming to have a broad base;
  • more on busybodies;
 

[1] BPLF = Balanced Positive (spiritual) Light Forces. See here and here for more on this. 
[2] Please see here, here and my post "The Death of Wikipedia" for the reasons I now recommend caution when using Wikipedia. I'm also exploring use of h2g2, although that doesn't appear to be as extensive (h2g2 is intended - rather engagingly - to be the Earth edition of "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy").
[3] I apologise for the formatting: it seems Blogger is no longer as WYSIWYG as it used to be, and there are a lot of unwanted changes to layout made upon publishing, so I often have to edit it immediately after publishing to get the format as close to what I want as possible.

Love, light, hugs and blessings
(pronounced "new-MYTH-ear"; ... aka Bellatrix Lux … aka Morinehtar … would-be drýicgan or maga ... )
My "blogiography" (list of all posts and guide as to how to best use this site) is here, and my glossary/index is here.

I started this blog to cover karmic regression-rescue (see here and here), and it grew ... See here for my group mind project, here and here for my "Pagans for Peace" project (and join me for a few minutes at some time between 8 and 11 PM on Sunday, wherever you are, to meditate-clear for peace), and here for my bindrune kit-bag. I also strongly recommend learning how to flame, ground and shield, do alternate nostril breathing, work with colour, and see also here and be flexible.

Tags: activism, discrimination, energy work, magick, meditation, nonviolence, peace,  society, violence, war,
First published: Laugardagr, 25th July, 2015
Last edited (excluding fixing typo's and other minor matters): Saturday, 25th July, 2015